Labor Day Weekend Roundup

I don’t know why you’re reading this with college football on today but if you are here are 3 good things we read this week.

Happy Labor Day Saturday!

[Starting clockwise from the top…you can click on the pictures OR the links below]

Interesting scientific research being done to see what iPhones and Twitter and blogs do to our brain. I made that sound a lot more boring than it actually is…

Some good advice I’ve been using from Michael Hyatt on how to clean your inbox. I think Jen actually cursed my name the other day because I only had one email in it. She doesn’t love organization like I do. Whatever.

The wealthiest athlete of all time? It’s not who you think.

Photo Attribution: Rome | Folders | Camera

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3 Dilemmas and Two Babies

All parts of our weekend. Enjoy.

1. Drive-in movie. Biggest dilemma: to buy food and drink there or to sneak it in. We debated for a long time and decided to purchase on site. Not because the bible says to obey the law, but because we always tout phrases like, “Support your local businesses.” We don’t picket or anything, but we say it. At least to each other. Inception= good. Salt= better. I was cheering for Angelina when I thought she was a Russian spy, which made me feel less than patriotic and made me care a little less about the welfare of our local mom and pop drive-in. We still bought a Sprite.

2. We posted pics of the flea market trip, but what we didn’t share was the delicious glory we encountered on the south end. Fruit. Lots of it, and really cheap. You know those cartons of strawberries you buy from the store that cost about $2.50 right now? Well we found those for $1 each. And blueberries. And blackberries. Except that they weren’t local, and we’re not sure how they got them so cheap, but pretty sure they might have knocked over a fruit truck on their way to set up shop. We didn’t ask many questions, and we probably have blood fruit on our hands. But they’re oh so tasty. Not like blood at all.

3. If you could somehow find a way to scam a game show and take home hundreds of thousands of dollars, would you? Is it cheating? Check out this story about Michael Larson and imagine the debate we had after listening. Click here, stream episode, and start about 38 minutes in.

Also, Molly Piper had her twins yesterday. We don’t know her and never will, but we love her blog and her babies.

Happy Monday.

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Famous People Tweets Are Easy

I was listening to NPR as I was driving to work yesterday (I don’t know whether to apologize to my family that those letters weren’t F-O-X or make a joke about how many posts I’ll start with “I was listening to NPR…” so I’ll go with neither) and there was a man on there talking about something interesting (imagine that).

He was talking about something that I believe dominates our society and our relationships the way Heidi Montag dominates silicon production in the United States (if you don’t get that, don’t Google it). He was talking about how superficiality is drowning out substantiality.

What percent of Twitter, Facebook, Google, and, heck, the internet itself is superficial? 99%? 99.9%? You have the occasional creation of something like Kiva or Wikipedia that adds value to society but so much of it is rubbish that most of the time it’s hard to tell the difference. It’s like trying to get 4 oz. of cream to rise in a 5 million gallon bucket of milk.

But isn’t it the same in marriage?

How much of what I do in my marriage on a day-to-day basis is substantial? I would argue (I am arguing) that the emotional energy spent creating substantive conversation or activity at times seems unworthy of the time and focus I have to put into it. Perhaps that’s because I have an arrogant view of what my time is worth.

It’s easy to Tweet: “I am going to the gym because I just ate a hamburger. I am meeting friends there.” It’s even easier to Tweet: “[fill in famous quote from famous person].” The hard part? Creating your own material and conveying that material in an original manner that adds value.

What is true online is true in real life as well (can I get someone on making that a geometrical proof?).

It’s easy to buy a bundle of flowers and a vase and plop them down on the kitchen table. It’s even easier to drop two $20s on dinner at a nicer-than-Applebees restaurant. To wake up every morning with a plan of how I’m going to create content and lead conversation and block off substantive time with which I can dynamically lead my wife in our pursuit of the Lord and each other?

That’s difficult.

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